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Religious heritage

Religious heritage Alsace is a spiritual region: Romanesque art, Gothic art , Baroque style... numerous mnuments reflect the Catholic, Protestant and Jewish communities. Today, Alsace remains the most multi-confessional region in France. The following results are listed in alphabetical order.

Prestations

21 results

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Ebersmunster
The only baroque abbey-church in Alsace (18th c.). Silbermann organ (1730). Concerts on Sunday in May at 5 p.
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Marmoutier
One of the most remarkable monuments in Alsace. Romanesque façade (beginning of the 12th c.), nave and narthex (13th c.
Capacity: 
80
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Altorf
The abbey church of Saint-Cyriaque is a curious mixture of architectures from different periods located in the village of Altorf, located on the old Roman road to Strasbourg.
Capacity: 
30
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Molsheim
The museum building was the Prior's house in the town's former Carthusian monastery (1598-1792). Archeological collections, popular arts and traditions, documents of Bugatti cars.
Capacity: 
30
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Hunawihr
Fortified church and graveyard (15th c.). Unique architectural grouping and classified historical monument.
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Strasbourg
Climbing up to the Cathedral’s platform and guard house is a thrilling experience. Since it was built, the platform has been a popular tourist attraction, and, until recently, a strategic fire lookout.
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Niederhaslach
Gothic collegiate-church (13th c.). Stained glass windows of the 14th and 15 th c. The relics of St Florent were left there in 810.
Capacity: 
50
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Avolsheim
Romanesque church of the 10th c. Nave consecrated in 1049 by Pope Leon IX. Mass was celebrated in this church since Merovingian times.
Capacity: 
30
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Molsheim
Late Gothic style (1615-1617). Remarkable elements: frescoes, paintings, stucco and gilding in the transept chapels.
Capacity: 
30
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Ottrott
This site was inhabited in the Prehistoric era (as proved by the “Pagans Wall” built c. 1.000 B.C.
Capacity: 
50

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